Treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with systemic steroids and valacyclovir

Brainerd diarrhea is a sudden-onset watery, explosive diarrhea that lasts for months and does not respond to antibiotics ; the cause of Brainerd diarrhea is unknown. Brainerd diarrhea was first described in Brainerd, Minnesota in 1983. [1] It has been associated with the consumption of raw milk [1] and untreated water. [2] [3] Of the ten outbreaks reported since 1983, nine have been in the . The characteristics of each outbreak have been similar to that caused by an infectious agent . Although a comparatively large outbreak (117 patients) occurred in 1996 in Fannin County, Texas ., [4] the largest outbreak (122 patients) was the original one in Brainerd, MN. There have been no secondary cases reported in any of the outbreaks, suggesting that the causative agent cannot be passed from person to person, but boiling water appears to inactivate the Brainerd agent. Although there is no treatment available, the disease does appear to resolve itself, although this process takes months if not years. [5] [6]

Use of an AED requires bystander assistance. The bystander operates the AED by applying the electrodes to the patient and following instructions. 

In contrast, the WCD requires no bystander intervention. The WCD protects patients when they are alone or sleeping. The WCD provides constant monitoring, immediate protection, and offers peace of mind for patients. In addition, the WCD offers peace of mind for family members who may worry about awaiting EMS personnel arrival or having to resuscitate a loved one themselves. (See downloadable PDF at end of page.)

Rauch D. Steven, MD; Halpin F. Christopher, PHD; Antonelli J. Patrick, MD; Babu Seilesh, MD; Carey P. John, MD; Gantz J. Bruce, MD; Goebel J. Joel, MD; Hammerschlag E. Paul, MD; Harris P. Jeffrey, MD, PHD; Isaacson Brandon, MD; Lee Daniel, MD; Linstrom J. Christopher; Parnes S. Lorne, MD; Shi Helen, MS; Slattery H. William, MD; Telian A. Steven, MD; Vrabec T. Jeffrey, MD; Reda J. Domenic, PHD “Oral vs Intratympanic Corticosteroid Therapy for Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss” The Journal of the American Medical Association (.) Taken from:
http://-/content/305/20/?sid=85677bf8-88a4-... Taken on October 10, 2011

Treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with systemic steroids and valacyclovir

treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss with systemic steroids and valacyclovir

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